legal

Oracle to Get New Legal Chief as Longtime Leader Daley Exits (1)

Oracle Corp. could soon have a new top lawyer as veteran general counsel Dorian Daley prepares to retire in August.

Daley notified Oracle’s board June 27 of her intention to retire next month, according to a July 1 securities filing. Oracle said Daley will “assist in the transition of her duties until her retirement becomes effective.”

Oracle and Daley didn’t respond to requests for comment about the computer technology and software company’s plans for her successor.

In June, Oracle received regulatory approval for its $28.3 billion acquisition of medical records provider Cerner Corp., while also securing a judge’s ruling nixing class action status for women suing over pay equity claims.

The company, whose chairman and chief technology officer is billionaire Larry Ellison, said in its most recent proxy statement that Daley earned nearly $11.3 million in total compensation during fiscal 2021. She has also sold off approximately $45.6 million in Oracle stock since last year, according to securities filings.

Daley’s annual pay included $875,000 in base salary, a $1 million bonus, and nearly $9.4 million in stock awards. The bonus was “in recognition” of her “significant contributions to Oracle’s legal strategy and success,” the company said in its

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‘Non-Lawyer Legal Help’ Are No Longer Banned Words in New York

Welcome back to the Big Law Business column on the changing legal marketplace written by me, Roy Strom. Today, we look at a case that pits free speech against the provision of legal advice by people who are not lawyers. Sign up to receive this column in your inbox on Thursday mornings. Programming Note: Big Law Business will be off next week for Memorial Day.

The late comedian George Carlin famously said there are seven words you can’t say on TV.

For non-lawyers, there have been far more than seven words they can’t say—if they drift anywhere close to practicing law. Those banned words include, “Check that box.”

But now that’s changing.

A federal judge in Manhattan this week ruled a non-profit can train regular people to provide free help for New Yorkers filling out responses to debt collection lawsuits.

The order lets Upsolve Inc.’s “justice advocates” tell debt collection defendants what boxes to check on a one-page response to the lawsuits.

The ruling could create a roadmap for other programs to provide less-expensive legal advice in other types of cases. The increasingly high cost of hiring a lawyer is driving similar efforts in other states.

Everyone involved in

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‘Tennessee Justice Bus’ to bring legal advice to rural communities

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) — The Tennessee Supreme Court has a new program to bring legal help to rural and disadvantaged communities through the Tennessee Justice Bus.

The bus is filled with computers, a printer, internet access, video displays, and other office supplies.

Lawyers and volunteers will be able to provide on-the-spot access to legal help and meet Tennesseans where they are to address the technology gap many rural and disadvantaged citizens face.

Access to Justice has been one of the Tennessee Supreme Court’s top priorities.

They said contrary to popular belief, people are not guaranteed access to an attorney when they encounter civil legal issues.

People who can’t afford an attorney are left to handle a variety of legal issues on their own like evictions, child custody, debt and credit issues, and unfair labor practices.

The bus will help fill the gap.

The Tennessee Justice Bus will officially launch Monday morning in downtown Nashville.

The Tennessee Justice Bus will travel the state to provide pop-up legal services where needed. These legal clinics and community events are commonly held in conjunction with legal aid providers, churches, nonprofit organizations and public service providers

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How are law firms and in-house legal departments collaborating to deliver results?

“I think legal departments now are really focused on how do they narrow the funnel of work as much as possible to their own department, and that is through self-service or bots,” said Brenda Hansen, senior legal operations consultant at UpLevel Ops, an advisory firm for in-house legal departments. Through her lens, Hansen noted that legal departments are increasingly using technology to give their internal clients the best information they can before letting them go off on their own, and also outsourcing to alternative legal service providers.

Colin Miller, managing director at FTI Consulting added that teams are collecting and organizing data differently.

“The question has become ‘what do I do with this new form of data, and how do I transform it, and how do I enrich it in a way that allows me to do the things I used to do to make those legal decisions?’ so it has become more advisory in that regard,” said Miller. The change in data is forcing people to innovate very quickly, Miller added.

Collaboration is critical when it comes to cybersecurity so the team at Fasken have developed a collaborative privacy protection program for their clients.

“The Fasken Edge site helps

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Why Major Companies Are Outsourcing Legal Solutions

More legal departments are looking to outside talents to bolster their ranks and grow their business. Wolters Kluwer’s new survey of 100 legal executives shows that 93% of legal or compliance departments have outsourced work in the last three years.

And these are more than just smaller companies: The respondents came from entities making more than $500 million in revenue, with the increase most prevalent among institutions with $1 billion-$4 billion in annual revenue.

Why are even institution-sized firms pulling in external experts? And what duties are those hires performing?

Why Now? 

As the survey responses show, outsourcing legal solutions solves multiple problems for legal departments.

One: It eases workflow, allowing companies to redistribute workload to dedicated experts, thereby freeing their in-house counsel to manage and tackle larger, more complex aspects of their project.

Two: On-demand in-house counsel keep the budget down without sacrificing quality. As Wolters Kluwer found, GCs anticipate a 25% increase in workflow, but 88% anticipate needing to trim their budgets. On-demand solutions let them do both.

Third, hiring on-demand counsel for bespoke solutions allows companies to grow their business without burning out their staff. Plus, it lets legal departments test new methods that keep

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