personal property

Why bankruptcy judge declined to hold Chris Pettit in contempt

Christopher “Chris” Pettit, the ex-San Antonio attorney accused of absconding with millions of dollars of clients’ money, has again avoided being held in contempt of court in his bankruptcy case — for now.

At an emergency hearing Thursday, Chief U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Craig Gargotta declined to grant the Chapter 11 trustee’s request to hold Pettit in contempt for violating a court order prohibiting him from transferring or disposing of any of his personal property.

But the judge ordered Pettit — who has been living in an $8 million mansion at Disney World while working as a $15.75-an-hour cook on the resort’s grounds — to appear in the San Antonio court next week to show why he shouldn’t be sanctioned for violating the court’s order.

“Mr. Pettit, I know you work. I know you’re in Florida. Can’t do much about that,” Gargotta told Pettit, who appeared by video. “You need to be here on Sept. 8.”

Trustee Eric Terry requested the emergency hearing after one of his lawyers, Patrick Huffstickler, got a phone call from Rob Vogt of Vogt Auction Galleries.

Vogt told him that someone had come by the business to inquire about selling personal property at a house on

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Sonoma County homeowners jolted with insurance hikes as a result of wildfire risk

Lesley Muller said her jaw dropped when she got her renewal notice from the carrier that insures her Cloverdale home. The bill increased by $700 annually to $2,200.

“When I got it, it shocked me,” said Muller, a retiree whose insurer also covers her family’s cars and a home in Arizona.

She called up her insurance broker who checked with five other carriers that all declined to make an offer and said the only other option would be the state FAIR plan, which is the state’s insurer of last resort. That option would be considerably more expensive for less coverage.

“So, what do you do? Pay the high premium!” added Muller, who declined to name the carrier to prevent any repercussions.

She’s not alone.

Greg Lucas of Santa Rosa said his bill originally went up about 50% to $2,150 annually from CSAA Insurance. He checked around but could find no better deal and ended up reducing the price to about 25% spike by upping his deductible and lowering the amount of personal property coverage.

Torben Moller of Windsor renewed his policy at a 50% increase and added he “can’t complain too loudly” because wildfires have driven risk for carriers

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California Earthquake Insurance: Requirements, Coverage, Cost

  • While earthquake insurance is optional in California, home insurers must offer it to new homebuyers. 
  • Earthquake insurance covers your dwelling, personal property, and provides loss-of-use coverage.
  • You can purchase earthquake insurance through your homeowners insurance provider. 

California has a well-earned reputation as the earthquake capital of the US. Yet only 10% of California residents have earthquake insurance, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Many homeowners are underprepared for financial losses associated with earthquakes, which are not covered by standard


homeowners insurance

policies. If you’re a Californian living near a major fault line, you can protect yourself with earthquake insurance.

Is earthquake insurance required in California?

California homeowners are not legally obligated to buy earthquake insurance, and


mortgage lenders

don’t require it, says Glenn Pomeroy, chief executive officer of the California Earthquake Authority (CEA), the nation’s largest earthquake insurance provider. However, California law makes it mandatory for providers like State Farm and Allstate to proactively offer earthquake insurance in conjunction with a homeowners insurance policy to new homebuyers, according to Pomeroy.

Homeowners insurance will not cover earthquakes. You must purchase a separate policy to get coverage. Given the large number of damage-causing

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What is an insurance rider in a homeowners insurance policy?

Our goal here at Credible Operations, Inc., NMLS Number 1681276, referred to as “Credible” below, is to give you the tools and confidence you need to improve your finances. Although we do promote products from our partner lenders who compensate us for our services, all opinions are our own.

If you’re worried your homeowners insurance policy doesn’t provide enough protection, you may want to take out an insurance rider for additional coverage. (Shutterstock)

Homeowners insurance can give you peace of mind that your home and financial interests are protected. How much coverage you get from homeowners insurance varies by policy, but you generally get some level of protection when it comes to liability, your home’s structure, your belongings, and additional living expenses. 

That being said, homeowners insurance policies don’t cover everything, and you may need to purchase an insurance rider to get the full coverage you want. 

Here’s what you need to know about insurance riders.  

With Credible, you can easily compare homeowners insurance quotes from top insurance carriers.

What is a homeowners insurance rider?

A homeowners insurance rider acts as an add-on to a homeowners insurance policy. You may also hear riders referred to as endorsements or

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